Apple Cider Vinegar – A Fast (And Factual!) Guide

By author photo Jenny Craig Team

health

If you believe everything you read on the internet, apple cider vinegar is a cure for everything that ails us – from fading bruises, curing hiccups to being the cure for obesity. The problem is, there’s not a lot, if any, scientific evidence to back up a lot of these claims. There’s so much misinformation out there that we’ve had our Dietitians put together a guide to what the science is telling us about apple cider vinegar – so it’s information you can feel comfortable trusting.

Let’s start with the basics; what is apple cider vinegar? Apple cider vinegar is made from crushed apples (apple cider), which is exposed to yeast, turning the naturally-occurring sugars in the apple cider to alcohol. The next step is to add bacteria, which ferments the alcohol, turning it into acetic acid. Acetic acid is what gives vinegar it’s tangy, almost sour flavour.

There is exciting research that shows that apple cider vinegar may have useful applications in people with Type 2 Diabetes or prediabetes. Consuming apple cider vinegar before or during a carbohydrate or grain-containing meal may help to increase insulin sensitivity, so your body uses less insulin to digest the carbohydrate in the meal, helping to reduce blood sugar levels more quickly. This means it may help to keep blood sugar levels more stable, which can help prevent diabetic complications.

A small amount of research also suggests that consuming apple cider vinegar as part of a meal may also help to increase feelings of fullness, which may lead to a decrease in kilojoules consumed. So apple cider vinegar may help with weight management, however more research is required.

The great news is apple cider vinegar contains very few kilojoules, and is a Free Food on the Jenny Craig program, so you can incorporate it in to your menu however you like! Apple cider vinegar is a versatile ingredient and can be used in drinks or as part of a salad dressing. It’s best to drink apple cider vinegar diluted with water to avoid an upset stomach, and preferably using a straw as it’s very acidic so is best to avoid contact with your tooth enamel if possible.

If you’d like to learn more about the Jenny Craig program, simply click the Chat to a Consultant box below, or click here for more information about getting started.

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